Monday, August 20, 2018

Stabilized Maple Burl Scales

I was lucky enough to pick up some Cactus Juice from a Canadian source (my friend John from Canadian Artisan) which didn't kill me on shipping. I had not yet tried Cactus Juice yet, but had worked with Stick Fast stabilizing resin in past stabilization projects and was quite happy with the results.


The wood is from a friend's back yard. I used a temporary fence on my Porta-Band to slice the scales out.




















Although the relative humidity here is quite low, I took an extra step to really dry out the wood. Into the toaster oven for the day at 50 to 100°C to reduce any moisture in the wood before going in the vacuum chamber.






Working the vacuum in the resin solution.











Here's the results of two amazing sets. Once they are whetted they really pop. (Click for a larger image.)

























Dan

10 comments:

Unknown said...

Stabilizing gets to be addictive but fun, thanks for the link.

John

Johan Nel said...

Great work, Dan. Those scales look amazing!

D. Comeau said...

Thanks Johan!

Bubb said...

Dan I need some pointers trying to do a laminated scales. But the top is radioused into the bottom. Can you look at my post on Hobby making for pics?

Doug Weaver said...

Dan! I just realized I haven’t seen you around- what’s your position on 2x72 grinder as far as 2-3hp, 1750 or 3k speed- the F class versus B class insulation. Plan on using a KB drive model 27 or 29 1phase to 3phase unit

D. Comeau said...

Hi Doug,

I fell off of the Facebook about 9 months ago. It was taking up way too much of my time.

Personally, I would stick to the 2 hp motor. Simply because it's so much easier to find a VFD that runs on single phase for it. For example, the KBAC 29 is only rated for 3 hp when it is powered with a three phase input. Otherwise its rating is 2 hp.

The insulation class F is better than B, but only by about 35°C. For a lightly loaded motor in a moderately warm shop either insulation class won't be an issue.

As for the speed, I am a fan of two pole (~3600 RPM) motors on grinders. Starting from a desired belt speed and working backwards, you'll find a two pole with a 4" drive wheel will give you all the speed you need. 5000 SFM and beyond. Whereas a four pole (~1800 RPM) motor with a 4" drive wheel tops out around 3800 SFM and that's running the motor at twice the intended speed using the 120 Hz setting on the KBAC. I like to grind and polish in the 4000 to 5000 SFM range and the only way I could get there with a 4 pole motor is with a larger diameter (read more expensive) drive wheel.

Yes, there is always a trade-off between torque and speed. But, I've never had the need to press so hard on a grinder that it stalls a 2 hp motor. Guys that are stalling motors must be doing something wrong. LOL IMHO knife grinding is more about finesse than brute force. ;-)

Great to hear from you. I hope that you are good health and keeping busy.

Dan

kmcgovern said...

Very nice Dan. Hope all's well. Haven't talked in a while.

D. Comeau said...

Hey Kevin,

How are things? Yes, all is well. I have been very busy working on a bunch of knife orders for the Christmas season.

Dan

Rob Legate said...

Lots of nice burl in those scales. Looks like we both got in on the group buy with John Noon (thx John), I'm on my 2nd gallon of cactus juice and haven't ground any steel since getting into this. Did you get a Cactus Juice brand vacuum chamber?

-Rob (cuatroxcuatro)

D. Comeau said...

Hi Rob,
Ya I probably should have something more substantial for a vacuum chamber, but I've used an old pickle jar for my last two batches and it's holding up.

Dan